bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation
Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.
The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.
There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.
There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.
Long Live the Book!
bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation
Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.
The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.
There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.
There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.
Long Live the Book!
bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation
Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.
The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.
There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.
There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.
Long Live the Book!
bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation
Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.
The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.
There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.
There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.
Long Live the Book!
bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation
Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.
The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.
There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.
There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.
Long Live the Book!

bookpatrol:

Unbinding the Book: A New Era of Book Creation

Unbinding the Book is a collaboration between the independent publishing platform Blurb and the visual arts studio Jotta.

The challenge:

push the boundaries of how books can be experienced, by evoking the storytelling properties of print and the way in which images evoke a narrative, whilst bringing to life the materiality, form and physicality that make books so alluring and different from their digital counterparts.

Nine artists and designers were commissioned to get to work creating a ”book”.

There were three launch events held in London, San Francisco and New York and when all the projects are completed there will be exhibited at the London Art Book Fair, hosted by The Whitechapel Gallery and then move to San Francisco and New York.

There is a blog to accompany the project where to you can stay current with the goings on.

Long Live the Book!

(via idenythisreality)

bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet
Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”
Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!
bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet
Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”
Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!
bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet
Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”
Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!
bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet
Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”
Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!

bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet

Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”

Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!

uispeccoll:

houghtonlib:

Dürer, Albrecht, 1471-1528. Vnderweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel vn̄ Richtscheyt, in Linien ebnen vnnd gantzen Corporen, 1525.
Typ 520.25.340
Houghton Library, Harvard University

Typography!  Dürer!
uispeccoll:

houghtonlib:

Dürer, Albrecht, 1471-1528. Vnderweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel vn̄ Richtscheyt, in Linien ebnen vnnd gantzen Corporen, 1525.
Typ 520.25.340
Houghton Library, Harvard University

Typography!  Dürer!
uispeccoll:

houghtonlib:

Dürer, Albrecht, 1471-1528. Vnderweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel vn̄ Richtscheyt, in Linien ebnen vnnd gantzen Corporen, 1525.
Typ 520.25.340
Houghton Library, Harvard University

Typography!  Dürer!

uispeccoll:

houghtonlib:

Dürer, Albrecht, 1471-1528. Vnderweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel vn̄ Richtscheyt, in Linien ebnen vnnd gantzen Corporen, 1525.

Typ 520.25.340

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Typography!  Dürer!

erikkwakkel:

Bookmarks before browsers
These four medieval bookmarks are 500-700 years old, yet they are smarter than what we use for our modern books - or even in our web browsers. Some just help you find your way back to a certain page, but others do so much more: they mark text column and line, in addition to the page. The lower one, for example, is like a computer that you program. Sliding it up and down, and turning its disk, means you will find your way back to a very specific place: the very line where you left off the day before.
More information on these rare devices and how they work in this blog I wrote about them.
Pics: Leiden, University Library, BPL 2001 (top); Utrecht, UB, MS 146 (bookmark labeled “B”); Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MSS I G 56-57 (heart-shaped bookmarks); and Harvard, Houghton Library, MS 277 (bottom).
erikkwakkel:

Bookmarks before browsers
These four medieval bookmarks are 500-700 years old, yet they are smarter than what we use for our modern books - or even in our web browsers. Some just help you find your way back to a certain page, but others do so much more: they mark text column and line, in addition to the page. The lower one, for example, is like a computer that you program. Sliding it up and down, and turning its disk, means you will find your way back to a very specific place: the very line where you left off the day before.
More information on these rare devices and how they work in this blog I wrote about them.
Pics: Leiden, University Library, BPL 2001 (top); Utrecht, UB, MS 146 (bookmark labeled “B”); Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MSS I G 56-57 (heart-shaped bookmarks); and Harvard, Houghton Library, MS 277 (bottom).
erikkwakkel:

Bookmarks before browsers
These four medieval bookmarks are 500-700 years old, yet they are smarter than what we use for our modern books - or even in our web browsers. Some just help you find your way back to a certain page, but others do so much more: they mark text column and line, in addition to the page. The lower one, for example, is like a computer that you program. Sliding it up and down, and turning its disk, means you will find your way back to a very specific place: the very line where you left off the day before.
More information on these rare devices and how they work in this blog I wrote about them.
Pics: Leiden, University Library, BPL 2001 (top); Utrecht, UB, MS 146 (bookmark labeled “B”); Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MSS I G 56-57 (heart-shaped bookmarks); and Harvard, Houghton Library, MS 277 (bottom).
erikkwakkel:

Bookmarks before browsers
These four medieval bookmarks are 500-700 years old, yet they are smarter than what we use for our modern books - or even in our web browsers. Some just help you find your way back to a certain page, but others do so much more: they mark text column and line, in addition to the page. The lower one, for example, is like a computer that you program. Sliding it up and down, and turning its disk, means you will find your way back to a very specific place: the very line where you left off the day before.
More information on these rare devices and how they work in this blog I wrote about them.
Pics: Leiden, University Library, BPL 2001 (top); Utrecht, UB, MS 146 (bookmark labeled “B”); Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MSS I G 56-57 (heart-shaped bookmarks); and Harvard, Houghton Library, MS 277 (bottom).

erikkwakkel:

Bookmarks before browsers

These four medieval bookmarks are 500-700 years old, yet they are smarter than what we use for our modern books - or even in our web browsers. Some just help you find your way back to a certain page, but others do so much more: they mark text column and line, in addition to the page. The lower one, for example, is like a computer that you program. Sliding it up and down, and turning its disk, means you will find your way back to a very specific place: the very line where you left off the day before.

More information on these rare devices and how they work in this blog I wrote about them.

Pics: Leiden, University Library, BPL 2001 (top); Utrecht, UB, MS 146 (bookmark labeled “B”); Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MSS I G 56-57 (heart-shaped bookmarks); and Harvard, Houghton Library, MS 277 (bottom).

transhumanisticpanspermia:

dad-rock-davos:

sixpenceee:

Found on reddit 

Woman accidentally breaks smiling garden gnome and finds hidden limbless figurine melded inside of it.

Bury the gnome. Dig a deep hole and put the gnome in the hole.

incinerate the gnome. turn the gnome to ash and launch the ash into the fucking sun

(via imperial-radio)


Bibliophile’s locket ring by Locket Library

Bibliophile’s locket ring by Locket Library

Bibliophile’s locket ring by Locket Library
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685
uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.
May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!
-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)
TX705 .M46 1685

uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.

May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!

-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)

TX705 .M46 1685

aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)
aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)
aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)
aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)
aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)
aphroditemf:

Historical Maps
1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)
2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)
3. Martellus world map (1490)
4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)
5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)
6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)

aphroditemf:

Historical Maps

1. Anglo-Saxon Cotton world map (c. 1040)

2. Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (1154)

3. Martellus world map (1490)

4. Pietro Coppo map (1520)

5. ”Theatrum Orbis Terrarum” by Abraham Ortelius (1570)

6. ”Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula” by Hendrik Hondius (1630)

(via fuckyeahcartography)

thatblondelibrarian:

wordbookstores:

*Hangs bookseller head in shame*

I was telling my husband about the banned books display I was working on for a full 10 minutes before he said, “There’s really that many band kids at the college? This feels excessive.”

(via bookporn)

slowartday:

Bagrad Badalian 
slowartday:

Bagrad Badalian 
slowartday:

Bagrad Badalian 
slowartday:

Bagrad Badalian 

by ctophermac:

1/5

I’m thrilled to share a series of posters I illustrated for Strand Book Store in New York celebrating Banned Books Week (Sept. 22nd-28th)! I’ll be posting one of these illustrations every day this week just to remind you that banned books are the best books.

Thanks to art director Lisa Jee!

(via bookporn)

bookpatrol:

A New Fine Press Edition of “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman
“A holy book of the nation, along with the Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence,” - poet laureate Robert Hass on Leaves of Grass
To mark their one-hundredth publication the noted fine press publisher Arion Press has chosen the 1855 first edition of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman.
 Chosen in part as a tribute to the publisher’s predecessors Edwin and Robert Grabhorn, whose masterpiece was their 1930 edition of the Whitman poem.
“I thought Arion Press might do something with Whitman’s poetry that was different as to the text and yet pay tribute to the 1930 edition by using a similar format, production methods, and materials, but with a new design,” Hoyem writes in the prospectus for this new edition.
Read more
bookpatrol:

A New Fine Press Edition of “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman
“A holy book of the nation, along with the Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence,” - poet laureate Robert Hass on Leaves of Grass
To mark their one-hundredth publication the noted fine press publisher Arion Press has chosen the 1855 first edition of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman.
 Chosen in part as a tribute to the publisher’s predecessors Edwin and Robert Grabhorn, whose masterpiece was their 1930 edition of the Whitman poem.
“I thought Arion Press might do something with Whitman’s poetry that was different as to the text and yet pay tribute to the 1930 edition by using a similar format, production methods, and materials, but with a new design,” Hoyem writes in the prospectus for this new edition.
Read more
bookpatrol:

A New Fine Press Edition of “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman
“A holy book of the nation, along with the Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence,” - poet laureate Robert Hass on Leaves of Grass
To mark their one-hundredth publication the noted fine press publisher Arion Press has chosen the 1855 first edition of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman.
 Chosen in part as a tribute to the publisher’s predecessors Edwin and Robert Grabhorn, whose masterpiece was their 1930 edition of the Whitman poem.
“I thought Arion Press might do something with Whitman’s poetry that was different as to the text and yet pay tribute to the 1930 edition by using a similar format, production methods, and materials, but with a new design,” Hoyem writes in the prospectus for this new edition.
Read more

bookpatrol:

A New Fine Press Edition of “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman

“A holy book of the nation, along with the Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence,” - poet laureate Robert Hass on Leaves of Grass

To mark their one-hundredth publication the noted fine press publisher Arion Press has chosen the 1855 first edition of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman.

 Chosen in part as a tribute to the publisher’s predecessors Edwin and Robert Grabhorn, whose masterpiece was their 1930 edition of the Whitman poem.

“I thought Arion Press might do something with Whitman’s poetry that was different as to the text and yet pay tribute to the 1930 edition by using a similar format, production methods, and materials, but with a new design,” Hoyem writes in the prospectus for this new edition.

Read more

the13thdoctorbetterbeginger:

riversnogs:

It is the year after the Battle of Hogwarts. School is starting again. And the thestrals are confused by all of the attention they are getting.

oh

oh no

(via cobylockkills)