Accio Art

uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

Miniature…Tuesday!  (Didn’t quite finish these gifs yesterday for Miniature Monday.)
Advice from Polonius rendered as a miniature artist’s book and stored in a mini Globe Theater.
Hamlet. Act I. Scene III. Polonius’ P’s & Q’s / by Wm. Shakespeare ; as presented by Poole Press, 2002 ; [designed and produced by Maryline P. Adams]  Berkeley, Calif. : Poole Press, c2002.
Stop by and see, it’s in the Smith Miniatures Collection  PR2807.A3  P6 2002.

This post was referenced and this book was shown in our Live Stream today.  Missed the Live Stream?  You can still watch the “archived” video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVceEwlIFJs 
uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

Miniature…Tuesday!  (Didn’t quite finish these gifs yesterday for Miniature Monday.)
Advice from Polonius rendered as a miniature artist’s book and stored in a mini Globe Theater.
Hamlet. Act I. Scene III. Polonius’ P’s & Q’s / by Wm. Shakespeare ; as presented by Poole Press, 2002 ; [designed and produced by Maryline P. Adams]  Berkeley, Calif. : Poole Press, c2002.
Stop by and see, it’s in the Smith Miniatures Collection  PR2807.A3  P6 2002.

This post was referenced and this book was shown in our Live Stream today.  Missed the Live Stream?  You can still watch the “archived” video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVceEwlIFJs 
uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

Miniature…Tuesday!  (Didn’t quite finish these gifs yesterday for Miniature Monday.)
Advice from Polonius rendered as a miniature artist’s book and stored in a mini Globe Theater.
Hamlet. Act I. Scene III. Polonius’ P’s & Q’s / by Wm. Shakespeare ; as presented by Poole Press, 2002 ; [designed and produced by Maryline P. Adams]  Berkeley, Calif. : Poole Press, c2002.
Stop by and see, it’s in the Smith Miniatures Collection  PR2807.A3  P6 2002.

This post was referenced and this book was shown in our Live Stream today.  Missed the Live Stream?  You can still watch the “archived” video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVceEwlIFJs 

uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

Miniature…Tuesday!  (Didn’t quite finish these gifs yesterday for Miniature Monday.)

Advice from Polonius rendered as a miniature artist’s book and stored in a mini Globe Theater.

Hamlet. Act I. Scene III. Polonius’ P’s & Q’s / by Wm. Shakespeare ; as presented by Poole Press, 2002 ; [designed and produced by Maryline P. Adams]  Berkeley, Calif. : Poole Press, c2002.

Stop by and see, it’s in the Smith Miniatures Collection  PR2807.A3  P6 2002.

This post was referenced and this book was shown in our Live Stream today.  Missed the Live Stream?  You can still watch the “archived” video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVceEwlIFJs 


todaysdocument:

The Fiftieth Running of the Boston Marathon,  April 20, 1946

"One hundred and one long distance runners compete in the fiftieth annual marathon race of over 26 miles at Boston in the United States. Among the runners are former winners and young hopefuls. Through the suburbs of Boston the runners make their way. And all eyes are on courageous Stylianos Kyriakides of Greece, who passes last year’s winner. Kyriakides goes on to win in 2 hours, 29 minutes, 27 seconds and gain the laurel wreath."
Excerpted from: “United News” Newsreel, “Japanese go to polls in first free election [etc.], 1946”


todaysdocument:

The Fiftieth Running of the Boston Marathon,  April 20, 1946

"One hundred and one long distance runners compete in the fiftieth annual marathon race of over 26 miles at Boston in the United States. Among the runners are former winners and young hopefuls. Through the suburbs of Boston the runners make their way. And all eyes are on courageous Stylianos Kyriakides of Greece, who passes last year’s winner. Kyriakides goes on to win in 2 hours, 29 minutes, 27 seconds and gain the laurel wreath."
Excerpted from: “United News” Newsreel, “Japanese go to polls in first free election [etc.], 1946”


todaysdocument:

The Fiftieth Running of the Boston Marathon,  April 20, 1946

"One hundred and one long distance runners compete in the fiftieth annual marathon race of over 26 miles at Boston in the United States. Among the runners are former winners and young hopefuls. Through the suburbs of Boston the runners make their way. And all eyes are on courageous Stylianos Kyriakides of Greece, who passes last year’s winner. Kyriakides goes on to win in 2 hours, 29 minutes, 27 seconds and gain the laurel wreath."
Excerpted from: “United News” Newsreel, “Japanese go to polls in first free election [etc.], 1946”

todaysdocument:

The Fiftieth Running of the Boston Marathon,  April 20, 1946

"One hundred and one long distance runners compete in the fiftieth annual marathon race of over 26 miles at Boston in the United States. Among the runners are former winners and young hopefuls. Through the suburbs of Boston the runners make their way. And all eyes are on courageous Stylianos Kyriakides of Greece, who passes last year’s winner. Kyriakides goes on to win in 2 hours, 29 minutes, 27 seconds and gain the laurel wreath."

Excerpted from: “United News” Newsreel, “Japanese go to polls in first free election [etc.], 1946


uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!
I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!
Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!
I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!
Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!
I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!
Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!
I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!
Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures
-Laura H. 

uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!

I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!

Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures

-Laura H. 


pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin
On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.
In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)
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pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin

On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.

The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.

In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)


erikkwakkel:

Titanic-shaped medieval fragment
You are looking at a fragment of a handwritten medieval page cut into an odd shape so it could be pasted, as support, inside a book binding. Remarkably, our modern eyes recognize its shape as that of the Titanic, the unsinkable ship that was taken by the sea in 1912. The giant boat and the medieval book are not so different, if you think of it. Both were masterpieces of human ingenuity that incorporated numerous innovations. The ship went down in spite of it; so, too, did the handwritten book. The very fact that the above page was cut from a medieval manuscript shows that the object’s time had come. After the invention of the printing press bookbinders started to recycle “old-fashioned” handwritten books, using their pages as support for bindings. This fragment is like debris washed up on the shore: it’s what remains of the unsinkable handwritten book that went down under pressure of the printing press.
Pic: Lawrence, University of Kansas, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, MS 9/2:31 (France, c. 1100, incorrectly dated 890-910 in the library’s catalogue description - also source image). I spotted the fragment in this blog. Read this blog if you want to know more about cutting up medieval books.
View Larger

erikkwakkel:

Titanic-shaped medieval fragment

You are looking at a fragment of a handwritten medieval page cut into an odd shape so it could be pasted, as support, inside a book binding. Remarkably, our modern eyes recognize its shape as that of the Titanic, the unsinkable ship that was taken by the sea in 1912. The giant boat and the medieval book are not so different, if you think of it. Both were masterpieces of human ingenuity that incorporated numerous innovations. The ship went down in spite of it; so, too, did the handwritten book. The very fact that the above page was cut from a medieval manuscript shows that the object’s time had come. After the invention of the printing press bookbinders started to recycle “old-fashioned” handwritten books, using their pages as support for bindings. This fragment is like debris washed up on the shore: it’s what remains of the unsinkable handwritten book that went down under pressure of the printing press.

Pic: Lawrence, University of Kansas, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, MS 9/2:31 (France, c. 1100, incorrectly dated 890-910 in the library’s catalogue description - also source image). I spotted the fragment in this blog. Read this blog if you want to know more about cutting up medieval books.


todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!

todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”

Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!


teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.
teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED

I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!

Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!

Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  

And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway

An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.

Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.