bookpatrol:
The Really Small World of Tim Sidford
We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 
Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.
Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!
Previously on Book Patrol:Really Small CookbooksThe little libraries of Marc Giai-MinietA book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

bookpatrol:
The Really Small World of Tim Sidford
We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 
Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.
Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!
Previously on Book Patrol:Really Small CookbooksThe little libraries of Marc Giai-MinietA book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

bookpatrol:
The Really Small World of Tim Sidford
We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 
Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.
Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!
Previously on Book Patrol:Really Small CookbooksThe little libraries of Marc Giai-MinietA book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

bookpatrol:
The Really Small World of Tim Sidford
We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 
Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.
Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!
Previously on Book Patrol:Really Small CookbooksThe little libraries of Marc Giai-MinietA book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

bookpatrol:
The Really Small World of Tim Sidford
We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 
Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.
Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!
Previously on Book Patrol:Really Small CookbooksThe little libraries of Marc Giai-MinietA book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

bookpatrol:

The Really Small World of Tim Sidford

We all know good things come in small packages but British artist Tim Sidford takes the cake with his meticulous miniature interiors. 

Bordering on unbelievable, Sidford recreates the stuff that dreams are made of within the smallest of structures.

Here’s his take on his “bonkers hobby of creating miniature interiors”:

I love the drama of many historic interiors. Creating these models helps allows me to indulge my ‘inner designer’! The rooms are constructed from wood and card and wooden moulded decorative trim, as well as bits of old cereal packets, drinking straws, balsa wood, beads, plastic food packaging etc. The most enjoyable bit is painting the floors, walls and ceilings. Most of the furniture is by playmobil (although I will often customise it)

Wow!

Previously on Book Patrol:
Really Small Cookbooks
The little libraries of Marc Giai-Miniet
A book from Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House Library grows up

(via bookporn)

politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.
politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?
Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.
Via Electric Lit.

politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?

Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.

Via Electric Lit.

(via americanlibraryassoc)

lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Home Sweat Home - The Future is Ours - Oupas Design.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!
Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  
On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.   
 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. Padua: Salmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  
See all of our Miniature Monday posts here
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!
Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  
On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.   
 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. Padua: Salmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  
See all of our Miniature Monday posts here
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!
Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  
On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.   
 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. Padua: Salmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  
See all of our Miniature Monday posts here
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!
Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  
On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.   
 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. Padua: Salmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  
See all of our Miniature Monday posts here
-Laura H. 
uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!
Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  
On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.   
 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. Padua: Salmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  
See all of our Miniature Monday posts here
-Laura H. 

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  

On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.  

 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. PaduaSalmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  

See all of our Miniature Monday posts here

-Laura H. 

Lovely tag to follow - #bookhistory

uispeccoll:

I just wanted to draw your attention to a lovely tag you might want to follow:  #bookhistory (no space).  Looking for historic books?  Follow this tag!   

incidentalcomics:

Declarations of Independence
This is what it’s like to live with an almost-two-year-old.
incidentalcomics:

Declarations of Independence
This is what it’s like to live with an almost-two-year-old.
incidentalcomics:

Declarations of Independence
This is what it’s like to live with an almost-two-year-old.

incidentalcomics:

Declarations of Independence

This is what it’s like to live with an almost-two-year-old.

charlesclary:

One of the 5 I finished yesterday. 8” x 8” x 4”. White shimmery paper against this great wallpaper. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1rdc0eT



Library cake



Library cake
actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN
In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.
actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN
In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.
actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN
In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.
actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN
In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.
actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN
In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.

actegratuit:

LONG-BIN CHEN

In my artwork I always use printed matter - discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.

(via staceythinx)

charlesclary:

More shimmery paper with shimmery wallpaper. #paperart #papersculpture #Charlesclary via Instagram http://ift.tt/1rfpyHO

tragedyseries:

Hello, Readers!

I am going to be exhibiting at the Rose City Comic Con tabling with Periscope Studio (booth 1217/1223.) I hope you will come by to say hello and talk about sequential storytelling, illustration and cartooning with me.

Those unable to attend can still obtain prints, chapbooks and more via my etsy emporium! 

I hope to see you there!

BD

todaysdocument:

Avast! ‘Tis Talk Like a Pirate Privateer Day! Behold: the “Saucy Jack

During the War of 1812 a number of American ship owners engaged in what amounted to legalized piracy, known as privateering.  It involved the “militia of the sea,” enterprising entrepreneurs and adventure seekers hoping to make their fortune on the open ocean at the expense of the enemy.

Records of their activity, including this commission, or letter of marque, from the aptly named Saucy Jack were uncovered by staff at the National Archives at Atlanta:

One amazing little boat, and perhaps the most prolific southern privateer in the war, bore the perfect name: Saucy Jack.  The Jack was the capturing vessel in over a dozen documented cases and by all accounts had an amazingly successful string of luck during the war.  Or was it perhaps by the skill of her captain and crew?  We might never know.  We know tantalizingly little about this boat, but through the records of the Federal Courts and U.S. Customs, some of her deeds as an American privateer vessel live on.

Saucy Jack Commission, Saucy Jack vs Schooner Weazel and Cargo, Mixed Case Files 1790-1860, box 23, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Georgia (Savannah); Records of the District Courts of the United States, Record Group 21, National Archives at Atlanta.

More Privateering Plunder via The Text Message » The War of 1812: Privateers, Plunder, & Profiteering

muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie
"And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And burbled as it came!”
With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.
Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.
More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)
- Amy Spencer

muspeccoll:

Carroll’s Wonderland Menagerie

"And as in uffish thought he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!”

With an imagination as great as Lewis Carroll’s was, it’s no wonder he was able to create such a range of creatures to inhabit the appropriately named Wonderland.  In addition to the Jabberwock above,  Wonderland is home to a host of bizzare beings.  Most famous, perhaps, is the Cheshire Cat, who appears and disappears to give Alice some cryptic advice from time to time.

Other denizens of Wonderland are the toves, mome raths, and borogroves; talking flowers, a mock turtle, and even a caterpillar that smokes a hookah while dispensing even more crytpic advice to poor Alice.

More fabulous beasts from the mind of Lewis Carroll can be found by visiting us at Special Collections!  (Perhaps you might stop by on a hunt for the elusive Snark?)

- Amy Spencer

staygrandbeiconic:


LEGIT THE BEST POST I HAVE EVER SEEN.

I literally just reblogged this two times in a row. No fucks given. This is the greatest post on tumblr.
staygrandbeiconic:


LEGIT THE BEST POST I HAVE EVER SEEN.

I literally just reblogged this two times in a row. No fucks given. This is the greatest post on tumblr.

staygrandbeiconic:

LEGIT THE BEST POST I HAVE EVER SEEN.

I literally just reblogged this two times in a row. No fucks given. This is the greatest post on tumblr.

(via cobylockkills)