theurbanblabbermouth2:
Top: Mural in Poland of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from ebookfriendly
Bottom: Photo of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from theladyintweed

theurbanblabbermouth2:
Top: Mural in Poland of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from ebookfriendly
Bottom: Photo of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from theladyintweed

theurbanblabbermouth2:

Top: Mural in Poland of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from ebookfriendly

Bottom: Photo of The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, from theladyintweed

(via bookporn)

muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer
muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 
Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 
Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.
To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.
- Amy Spencer

muspeccoll:

Zombies.  The Undead.  The Living Dead.  The Walking Dead.  Whatever you call them, zombies have long been a large part of our folklore and popular culture and are this week’s featured creature here at Special Collections.  From ancient scrolls about the afterlife to modern day comics to the movies, the undead are on everyone’s brains - so to speak. 

Originally, a zombie was a dead body reanimated by a necromancer in Haitian folklore.  The soulless body would then act as the slave of the evil sorcerer, since it lacked a will of its own.  Nowadays, zombies are a staple in horror stories as soulless creatures with a craving for brains. 

Some, however, just want love, as in the story pictured in the comic above in which Maria’s zombie family kills her new husband Paul so the two can be together (and they say romance is dead).  Going back to the time of Ancient Egypt, the final images show a different kind of living dead - those that live on in the afterlife.  The first of the two images from The Book of the Dead shows the dead man rising out of his coffin as the four Children of Horus stand guard.  The symbol for life in each of his hands represents his resurrection.

To see any of the books featured here, lurch your way on up to us in Special Collections.

- Amy Spencer

visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek
handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)
this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 
the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.you can buy it via paypal directly here:
shipping to europe
shipping to the rest of the world 
for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.
[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronism, wachsein, falling alphabet & rotated alphabet]
visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek
handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)
this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 
the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.you can buy it via paypal directly here:
shipping to europe
shipping to the rest of the world 
for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.
[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronism, wachsein, falling alphabet & rotated alphabet]
visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek
handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)
this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 
the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.you can buy it via paypal directly here:
shipping to europe
shipping to the rest of the world 
for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.
[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronism, wachsein, falling alphabet & rotated alphabet]
visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek
handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)
this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 
the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.you can buy it via paypal directly here:
shipping to europe
shipping to the rest of the world 
for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.
[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronism, wachsein, falling alphabet & rotated alphabet]
visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek
handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)
this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 
the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.you can buy it via paypal directly here:
shipping to europe
shipping to the rest of the world 
for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.
[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronism, wachsein, falling alphabet & rotated alphabet]

visual-poetry:

»2 4get her SPECIAL EDITION 2014« by anatol knotek

handmade book, 70 typewriter poems, hardcover, color print, limited edition: 150 books, hand-numbered and signed by the artist, DIN A6 (4.1 x 5.8 inches)

this book is a collection of my concrete and visual poems of the last years, written with my »adler triumph gabriele 10« typewriter. as the subtitle says, it can also be read as a drama in four acts. 

the price is € 19,- ($ 24,-) plus packaging and worldwide shipping.
you can buy it via paypal directly here:

for more information (e.g. other payment options) please send me an e-mail.

[i also have some other handmade books available at the moment: anachronismwachseinfalling alphabet & rotated alphabet]

itscolossal:

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings [VIDEO]

charlesclary:

Finished a nice game of monopoly last night. Hand cut paper on found monopoly board. #paperart #papersculpture #art #paper #Charlesclary via Instagram http://ift.tt/1CqC1dP

fromwithinabook:

Summer Reading
Wire, Wadding & Vintage Book Pages
fromwithinabook:

Summer Reading
Wire, Wadding & Vintage Book Pages

fromwithinabook:

Summer Reading

Wire, Wadding & Vintage Book Pages

esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee
esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee

esabonesrattlin:

kristenraemiller:

For the month of October ‘til Halloween, my dad changes up the scene of these 2 skeletons on his front porch each day for the neighbors to check out. Very creative!

eeeeeeeeee

(via cryingmanlytears)

itscolossal:

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled
itscolossal:

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled
itscolossal:

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled
itscolossal:

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled
itscolossal:

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled
livelymorgue:

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times

charlesclary:

Exploring new nostalgic territory and how pain plays a big role. Hand cut paper and found game box. #paperart. #papersculpture #nostalgia #installation #Charlesclary via Instagram http://ift.tt/1EV27ti

the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  
Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.
the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  
Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.
the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  
Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.
the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  
Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.
the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  
Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.

the-goddamazon:

petrichoriousparalian:

mmcleodyoung:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

what is this magic?!

This magic is a Turkish technique called Ebru.  It uses dyes, paints, or pigments to draw on water, the finished image is then transferred to paper or fabric by laying it over the image.  

Also, watch more here.  And credit the artist: Garip Ay

This is also how one makes those marbled endsheets for books!

Holy shit. this is AMAZING.

(via somethinginspiringhere)