Accio Art

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 
City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.
See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 
See all of our posts with GIFS
-Laura H.

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFS

-Laura H.


muspeccoll:

hdslibrary:

Marginalia Monday, with Manicules!
Annotations are not uncommon in our collections, but the reader of this copy of a 1541 tract by Martin Luther is less restrained than many.  The pamphlet has large, flowing annotations throughout and numerous pointing hands, or manicules.  (Our student assistants have dubbed these markings “finger guns.”)
A modern reader might assume that the ‘no’s suggest disagreement with the text, but they are likely manuscript abbreviations for “nota.”
Notice also the unfortunate, later trimming of the text block, obscuring some of the marginalia.

Finger gunsmuspeccoll:

hdslibrary:

Marginalia Monday, with Manicules!
Annotations are not uncommon in our collections, but the reader of this copy of a 1541 tract by Martin Luther is less restrained than many.  The pamphlet has large, flowing annotations throughout and numerous pointing hands, or manicules.  (Our student assistants have dubbed these markings “finger guns.”)
A modern reader might assume that the ‘no’s suggest disagreement with the text, but they are likely manuscript abbreviations for “nota.”
Notice also the unfortunate, later trimming of the text block, obscuring some of the marginalia.

Finger guns

muspeccoll:

hdslibrary:

Marginalia Monday, with Manicules!

Annotations are not uncommon in our collections, but the reader of this copy of a 1541 tract by Martin Luther is less restrained than many.  The pamphlet has large, flowing annotations throughout and numerous pointing hands, or manicules.  (Our student assistants have dubbed these markings “finger guns.”)

A modern reader might assume that the ‘no’s suggest disagreement with the text, but they are likely manuscript abbreviations for “nota.”

Notice also the unfortunate, later trimming of the text block, obscuring some of the marginalia.

Finger guns


rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~
rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong
ink and digital
Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 
Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~

rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong

ink and digital

Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 

Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~


uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.
N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 
Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).

uispeccoll:

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils.

N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 

Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).


tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.
tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.
tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.
tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.
tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.
tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!You’ll need the following items:
-a steady hand
-a printing mechanism
-moderately sharp shears
-adhesive of some sort
-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.

tragedyseries:

Have you started a new relationship? Have friends that explore your treasures when they think you aren’t looking? Do you bunk with an old sea-salt who needs boundaries clearly expressed?

This sea beast barrier kit is for you then!
You’ll need the following items:

-a steady hand

-a printing mechanism

-moderately sharp shears

-adhesive of some sort

-7 to 10 minutes of uninterrupted time.


cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei
The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei
The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei
The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei
The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei

The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.

CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe